Traveling "The Jedi Path" with Author Daniel Wallace

“For over a thousand generations, the Jedi Knights were the guardians of peace and justice in the Old Republic.”

In A New Hope, Obi-Wan Kenobi fed an eager Luke Skywalker just enough cryptic details of the Jedi to pique the young moisture farmer's interest, and the fans followed suit. Who were these hooded beings who stood for peace yet were trained in advanced combat and wielded lightsabers? Questions like this, along with state-of-art special effects, memorable heroes and villains, and all of the spaceships a seven-year-old could want have kept the Star Wars films alive and sporadically in theaters for decades. (Rumor has it that George Lucas is prepping them all for a 3D release in 2012.) But now the time has come to shed light on the enigmatic Jedi in The Jedi Path.

In ancient times…students of the Force possessed a most valuable book, passed from Master to Padawan. After the destruction of the Jedi temple, only one copy survived. It is now passed on to you.

With the push of a button, the Jedi vault literally opens for fans, and within these pages lie plenty of answers and in-continuity details. For this week’s release of The Jedi Path, author Daniel Wallace offered fans insight into the making of the book with these exclusive behind-the-scenes details.

JP52

p. 52: Padawan braids are an iconic part of Jedi lore, and there's even one in this book as a removable souvenir (it's Qui-Gon's). But what if you're a member of a species that doesn't grow hair? Several alternatives are laid out here including the silka beads worn by Togrutas such as Star Wars: The Clone Wars' Ahsoka Tano. Other examples? Metal circlets placed on the horns of Iktotchi, facial tattoos borne by Sluissi, and medallions implanted into the flesh of Swokes Swokes (which ties into the background I created for the Swokes Swokes species in the book Star Wars: Geonosis and the Outer Rim Worlds).

Training to be a Jedi is a strict practice, and not all who study can pass the test--sometimes to disastrous results:

p. 50: This is the "Working With Your Master" section, and if it can be boiled down to one word, it's this: obey. In my view the Jedi operate under the principle of listening to one's elders. This makes sense from the point of view of a military/religious hierarchy. But Anakin doesn't think it makes sense, and bad things happened when Anakin's rebelliousness met the Jedi Order's inflexibility.

But it’s not all about academics and servitude. Fan-favorite Jedi Masters are given room for personal (and quirky) details:

p. 137: Yoda's comment about mounted combat reveals that he's on his thirty-third kybuck -- the goatlike creature he rides in the Clone Wars animated shorts. Yoda is centuries old, and perhaps kybucks don't live that long, but 33 seems like a lot! I was thinking that perhaps Yoda could be like that family everybody seems to know, the one that buys a new Irish Setter every ten years.

You want lightsabers? The Jedi Path has lightsabers!

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