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Top 10 Comics for Halloween

Happy Halloween, Omni readers! As I type this, the classic horror anthology Creepshow (1982) is on in the background, so let’s please blame any typos on my nerves. Once all the festivities finish today and tonight, the scares do not have to stop. In fact, we’ve compiled a Top 10 list of the most chilling comics published this fall. Full write-ups continue after the jump. Read at your peril.

  1. I, Vampire Vol. 1: Tainted Love by Joshua Hale Fialkov and Andrea Sorrentino
  2. Creepy Presents: Richard Corben by Richard Corben and various
  3. The Hive by Charles Burns
  4. Swamp Thing Vol. 1: Raise Them Bones by Scott Snyder and Yanick Paquette
  5. Fatale Vol. 1: Death Chases Me by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips
  6. B.P.R.D.: Plague of Frogs by Mike Mignola, John Arcudi, Guy Davis, and more
  7. "Came the Dawn" and Other Stories by Wallace Wood
  8. Ragemoor by Jan Strnad and Richard Corben
  9. American Vampire Vol. 4 by Scott Snyder and Rafael Albuquerque
  10. Creepy Archives Vol. 14 by Various

I, Vampire Vol. 1: Tainted Love by Joshua Hale Fialkov and Andrea Sorrentino: The sleeper hit in DC’s New 52 line, this vampire tale is full of violence, revenge, and unrelenting blood-spillage. Ignore the cover; the interior artwork is far darker and nightmarish.

Creepy Presents: Richard Corben by Richard Corben and various horror comic greats: This one is a bag full of treats, stuffed with iconic, psychedelic, and disturbing imagery from Richard Corben, a legendary contributor to Creepy and Eerie magazines. Humor and horror abound, not to mention faithful color restoration by Jose Villarrubia, who also pens a very informative introduction that will bring newcomers up to date on Corben’s significance to the genre.

The Hive by Charles Burns: It’s been a long two years since X’ed Out, the precursor to this middle installment in Burns’ purported trilogy, but the artist has only increased the weirdness while we waited. The hallucinatory horror—especially a sequence involving a pig fetus—will leave readers squirming in their seats.

Swamp Thing Vol. 1: Raise Them Bones by Scott Snyder and Yanick Paquette: Horror in the New 52 continues, as Scott Snyder weaves Swamp Thing into the mainstream DC universe. But don’t worry about continuity, as Snyder and Paquette combine terrifying imagery with a very smart script. This is indie horror with a mainstream effects budget.

Fatale Vol. 1: Death Chases Me by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips: Lovecraftian horror in a noir setting. Brubaker crafts generations of doomed sleuths, while Phillips lures readers into a familiar world only to sneak a tentacle into the shadows.

B.P.R.D.: Plague of Frogs by Mike Mignola, John Arcudi, Guy Davis, and more: Really, with that line-up of creators, I’m not sure the new hardcover collections need any more selling points, but here goes: apocalypse, demons, curses, mummies, ghosts, and rows of gnashing teeth. These four volumes collect ‘em all. 

"Came the Dawn" and Other Stories by Wallace Wood: Take a breather with what appears to be a quieter collection only to realize that publisher Fantagraphics curated a suspenseful, paranoid selection of stories from Wood's EC career. These reprints are for the discerning Halloween reader. 

Ragemoor by Jan Strnad and Richard Corben: Yes, a second Richard Corben book; he’s that good. You cannot seek shelter when it’s the shelter that's after you! This one takes haunted mansions to a new level and in glorious black and white.

American Vampire Vol. 4 by Scott Snyder and Rafael Albuquerque: Scott Snyder knows his horror, and this revamp of the classic vampire myth continues in its fourth volume—thankfully, it’s a pick-up-and-read thriller, so new fans can start here in the 1950s, with drag-racing, pony-tails, and bloodsuckers. 

Creepy Archives Vol. 14 by Various: I know I say it every October, but this volume really is the best yet. The stories are much more adult; the artwork has a strong European influence; and contributors include John Severin, Bernie Wrightson, and Howard Chaykin. The writer for I, Vampire, Joshua Hale Fialkov, pens an introduction.

All treats, no tricks! Tonight is the perfect time to start reading these creepy-crawlies. Go ahead, turn the page. That bump in the night was just the wind.

--Alex

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