IndieReader: If You Liked “Go Set a Watchman”, You’ll LOVE…

This article was originally published by IndieReader. Every Thursday we will publish an article from IndieReader that we think might be of interest to our readers.

 

WatchIndieReader: If You Liked “Go Set a Watchman”, You’ll LOVE…

By Keri English

Maycomb, Alabama. Twenty-six-year-old Jean Louise Finch—”Scout”—returns home from New York City to visit her aging father, Atticus.

Set against the backdrop of the civil rights tensions and political turmoil that were transforming the South, Jean Louise’s homecoming turns bittersweet when she learns disturbing truths about her close-knit family, the town, and the people dearest to her. Memories from her childhood flood back, and her values and assumptions are thrown into doubt.

Featuring many of the iconic characters from Lee’s first book, the beloved To Kill a Mockingbird, Go Set a Watchman perfectly captures a young woman, and a world, in painful yet necessary transition out of the illusions of the past—a journey that can only be guided by one’s own conscience.

Written in the mid-1950s, Go Set a Watchman imparts a fuller, richer understanding and appreciation of Harper Lee. Here is an unforgettable novel of wisdom, humanity, passion, humor, and effortless precision—a profoundly affecting work of art that is both wonderfully evocative of another era and relevant to our own times.

If you can’t get enough of Scout and Atticus, check out these literary indies.

 

P1

Pacific Avenue by Anne L. Watson

Richard Johnson is a black veteran, back from Vietnam and trying to rebuild his life by attending college in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He’s smart and handsome, yet haunted by memories that plague his sleep and send him flying for cover at sudden noises.

Kathy Woodbridge is a white student in one of Richard’s classes. She’s pretty, idealistic, and drawn irresistibly to Richard’s combination of charm and aliveness. It leads her into a relationship different from any she had expected — and to a tragedy greater than any she can face. Lacey Greer is a secretary in San Pedro, California. When Kathy shows up at her office and is hired with no record of her past, Lacey wonders what Kathy could be running from. She’s determined to find out, and to help if she can. Set in the early seventies, Pacific Avenue explores themes of love, belonging, helpfulness, hope, forgiveness, reconciliation, interracial marriage, and healing from the trauma of war.

 

P2

The Mason Jar by James Russell Lingerfelt

What if your old college roommate called, raving about a book someone sent her, calling it the most beautiful book she’s ever read? “But,” she said, “it’s about you.” The author is your college ex.

Clayton Fincannon is a Tennessee farm boy raised at the feet of his grandfather. He and his grandfather leave letters for each other in a Mason jar on his grandfather’s desk; letters of counsel and affirmation. When Clayton attends college in Southern California, he meets and falls in love with a dark, debutante, from Colorado. However, when an unmentioned past resurrects in her life and she leaves, Clayton is left with unanswered questions.

Clayton goes on to serve as a missionary in Africa, while he and his grandfather continue their tradition of writing letters. When Clayton returns home five years later to bury his grandfather, he searches for answers pertaining to the loss of the young woman he once loved. Little does Clayton know, the answers await him in the broken Mason jar.

 

P3

South of Everything by Audrey Taylor Gonzalez

Set in 1940s Germantown, Tennessee, South of Everything is a magical coming-of-age story about Missy Sara, the daughter of a plantation-owning family, who, despite her privileged background, finds more in common with “the help” than her own family.

Missy develops a special kinship with her parents’ servant Old Thomas, who introduces her to the mysterious Lolololo Tree––a magical, mystical tree with healing powers that she discovers is wiser than any teacher or parent or priest. Her connection with the Lolololo Tree opens her eyes to the religious and racial prejudice of her surroundings and readers will root for her to fight against injustice and follow her heart to meet her fate.

 

For more books on the list go to IndieReader.


Leave a Comment

Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear on this blog until approved.

Comments (0)

Lists + Reviews

Best Books Literature + Fiction Nonfiction Kids + Young Adult Mystery, Thriller + Suspense Science Fiction + Fantasy Comics + Graphic Novels Romance Eating + Drinking

Authors

Interviews Guest Essays Celebrity Picks

News + Features

News Features Awards

Editors

Omnivoracious, The Amazon Book Review

Feeds Facebook Twitter YouTube