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10 Songs: Greil Marcus and the Culture of Surprise

The History of Rock 'n' Roll in Ten SongsIf rock & roll has achieved institution status, Greil Marcus certainly qualifies as one of its pillars. As one of the most influential critics of rock music--a small and vital, club, to be sure--he has made a long, distinctive career by elevating an often disparaged form and placing it firmly (rightly) within the hierarchy of great art. In addition to his writing for the likes of Rolling Stone (he was its first reviews editor), Creem, and The Village Voice, Marcus has authored many books, often dealing with the idea that rock & roll is both a accelerant and amplifier of cultural memes, Narcissus and his reflection in one. Mystery Train: Images of America in Rock 'n' Roll Music, originally published in 1975, traced rock music's roots, evolution, and impacts--intuitive and otherwise--through the lives and careers of six epochal artists; TIME appointed it one of the 20th century's most influential nonfiction books. Lipstick Traces: A Secret History of the Twentieth Century launches itself from the Sex Pistols and the punk scene of the 70s into an examination of heretics, rioters, and iconoclasts spanning Western civilization, across both time and geography. There are many more, occasionally academic, always incisive, and definitely fun.

In his latest--The History of Rock 'N' Roll in Ten Songs--Marcus rambles the back roads of rock history to present  short biographies of 10 songs spanning the entire breadth of rock & roll, from doo-wop to post-punk, demonstrating how rock's impulse to combine (and recombine) its influences made each possible and entirely original. Two pieces of advice for readers: 1.) Unless your record collection is as expansive as Marcus's, have YouTube cued up so you can listen while you learn. 2.) Set "Shake Some Action" to repeat.

We asked Marcus for 10 songs that shaped his own rock & roll experience. Here's what he said.

 


 

Greil Marcus: 10 Songs

Rock & roll for me has always been a culture of surprise. When it’s at its best you never know what’s coming and you can’t wait to find out what it is—when all the music seems to be one great answer record, with everyone, performers, listenters, the radio, a club, even the background music in a supermarket or the foreground music in a restaurant part of the same conversation. That happens best on Quentin Tarantino soundtrack albums, which aren’t references to his movies but almost counter-works—from the neo-surf music in Reservoir Dogs to the creamy, sleazy pop on the two Kill Bill albums to Django Unchained, which is probably the best. But it can happen anywhere.

In the order they occurred to me:

Outkast, “Hey Ya!” (2003). As Lou Reed once said, when you first heard this song you felt as if you could listen to it forever—“And then you kind of had to.” But endless airplay didn’t wear the song out, it only revealed equally endless layers of play, emotion, and a life being lived: the cool comedy of the verses always falling into what seemed like the unalloyed joy of the chorus. And it was in the chorus that, after weeks, months, never, provided its own drama: the way the first “Hey ya” was nothing but a smile, the way the second pulled away from the first, with a dying fall of regret, loss, uncertainty, doubt. There is a whole history of American music in this song—minstrelsy, wild and fast L.A. doo-wop (the Jewels’ “Hearts of Stone,” the Hollywood Flames’ “Buzz Buzz Buzz”), Bob Dylan’s carnival sound (“I Want You”), Cyndi Lauper’s “Girls Just Want to Have Fun”—and also prophecy: a sound and a feeling the Roots will probably always be looking for.

Bo Diddley, “Say Man” (1959). Even by 1959, after Little Richard, after “The Book of Love,” I didn’t understand how anything this ridiculous—so ridiculous it was, somehow, pure anarchy, an epistemological proof that neither government nor society did, in fact, exist—was allowed on the public air. Now, long after learning that this was just a Top 40 version of the dozens, of The Signifying Monkey, of a harmless African-American insult ritual going back to forever, I still don’t.

Greil Marcus

Rolling Stones, “Gimmie Shelter” (1969). It’s been on the radio for 45 years and hasn’t lost anything. It’s kept up the with times, or the times are still chasing it. And I knew that would be the story from the first time I heard it.

Kingston Trio, “Tom Dooley” (1958). For me, proof that music—the language everyone was speaking, that everyone though was sufficient to say whatever needed to be said—could change overnight. The day before, whatever was on the radio sounded just right. The day after, it sounded old, tired, and fake. The same thing happened with “I Never Loved a Man (The Way I Love You)” and “Smells Like Teen Spirit.”

Hockey “Song Away” (2009). I heard it sitting outside a shoe store in Minneapolis. I caught a few words, maybe the title phrase, but mostly a smile that I couldn’t get out of my head. Thanks to the internet, I could track it down and play it a dozen times in a row. I still couldn’t get it out of my head. Whenever I think about it, I still can’t. That’s what rock & roll is for.

 

Portrait by Rich Black based on the original photo by Thierry Arditti

YA Wednesday: Meg Wolitzer on "Belzhar"

BelzharBack in June I read a book called Belzhar that I'd been hearing about.  Author Meg Wolitzer's The Interestings was one of our Best Books of 2013 and prior to that I'd loved her novel for middle graders, The Fingertips of Duncan Dorfman, so I was eager to read her first book for young adults.  It's amazing. And it just released so not only did it *finally* get to claim it's rightful spot at the top of our Best YA of October list, but now when I rave about it I don't have to follow-up with, "...but it won't be out until September 30th..."

Belzhar speaks to the experiences of love, loss, and reading something life-changing. And sharing those experiences with people you may never have picked out of a crowd but when life throws you together, deep friendships are forged.  I laughed, I cried, and in the video below I talked about Belzhar with Meg Wolitzer at Book Expo in New York. I enjoyed talking with her as much as I do reading her books.  Now I anxiously await the next...

National Book Award Finalists Announced

Drum roll, please. The National Book Awards shortlist was broadcast this morning. Celebrating the best in American literature, the winners will be announced at a ceremony on November 19 hosted by best-selling author, Daniel Handler (you might know him better by his other name--Lemony Snicket). So, without further ado, I give you this year's finalists, who about now must be penning particularly well-crafted acceptance speeches, just in case.

NBA FinalistsFiction:
All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
An Unnecessary Woman by Rabih Alameddine
Lila by Marilynne Robinson
Redeployment by Phil Klay
Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

Nonfiction:
Age of Ambition by Evan Osnos
Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant by Roz Chast
The Meaning of Human Existence by Edward O. Wilson
No Good Men Among the Living by Anand Gopal
Tennessee Williams by John Lahr

National Book Award FinalistsPoetry:
Citizen by Claudia Rankine
Faithful and Virtuous Night by Louise Glück
The Feel Trio by Fred Moten
Second Childhood by Fanny Howe
This Blue by Maureen N. McLane

Young People’s Literature:
Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson
Noggin by John Corey Whaley
The Port Chicago 50 by Steve Sheinkin
Revolution by Deborah Wiles
Threatened by Eliot Schrefer

 

Where I Wrote It: John Twelve Hawks, on Writing his New Novel, "Spark"

Readers of Omnivoracious may be familiar with our "How I Wrote It" Q-&-A series, in which we ask authors to describe the writing of their book (including questions about their work space, their tools, their fuel--you can read them here). In "Where I Wrote It," we'll be asking authors to share photographs of their desk or office, along with a brief description of that space and what role it played in the creation of their book. Our thanks to John Twelve Hawks, whose new novel, Spark, is a Best of the Month pick in mystery, thriller, and suspense.

John12Hawks

In our Digital Age, it's almost impossible to live "off the grid." But we can find places of refuge where we know that our thoughts are our own.

The first draft of my new novel, SPARK, was written at a friend's house in rural Ireland.

Every morning, I would sit at the kitchen table near the cast iron stove, drinking strong tea while I gazed out the window at a green world. Everything seemed possible at that moment, and words streamed in with the sunlight.

Spark2  --John Twelve Hawks

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[Note: John Twelve Hawks, a pseudonym, is famously, elusively anonymous. Here's a portion of a note he posted on his Random House-hosted website, announcing the publication of SPARK: "Contrary to Internet rumors, I am not dead or in prison. I do move around a great deal and live in London, rural Ireland and New York City."]

The Rules of the Handshake

I Stand Corrected Lots of people dream about doing the kinds of things Eden Collinsworth does routinely in her life: change jobs, move countries, strike out for parts unknown both internal and external. In the form of an etiquette guide, I Stand Corrected – excerpted below -- is both a cultural analysis of East-West relations and a witty memoir of a very unconventional life.


In 1985, I received an invitation from a delegation of Chinese businessmen offering me the opportunity to see Shenzhen. It was the height of China's policy of economic Opening Up, and this former fishing village had grown into a booming metropolis constructed with what looked to be gigantic Lego pieces. At the time, I was a book publisher. I was also young, fair- skinned and redheaded; and so, when I arrived in Shenzhen, it was easy for the Chinese to believe I might have come not from America, but from another planet entirely.

"What do you mean he's asked how much I am?" was my stunned question to the associate acting as my translator at a business dinner for which I was the host.

"Just that," he told me.

All at the table had been imbibing a great deal; it was not without reason that I asked my colleague if the man inquiring was sober. "He seems to be," was the answer.

"Have you correctly translated?" I asked? "Surely he's asked how much it would cost to buy the company we represent," I said.

"No. He means the cost for you, as a woman," reiterated my colleague. "Our guest has just inquired about taking permanent possession of you." Latching on to whatever composure had not already abandoned me, I pointed out that I was not just a woman, I was also the president of an American book publishing company. "One who happens to be the host this evening," I made clear.

"I can translate what you've just said," volunteered my colleague. "But it won't matter."

"Why not?" I wanted to know.

"Because he believes that your gender makes your professional rank insupportable."

And there it was. A full-in-the-face statement, which forced upon me the irrefutable difference between my self-image and my status in China where, at the time, I was Western luxury item possibly to be purchased.

"What would you like me to tell him?" asked my colleague.

It took a moment to realize that it wasn't so much that I needed to surrender my self-image as that I should consider suspending it. Making a bottom line calculation with that in mind, I responded with falsehoods calibrated to avoid embarrassment.

"First, thank him for his interest," I instructed my colleague. "Next, tell him I'm extremely flattered. And then let him know that, sadly, I belong to someone else."

That face-saving response—and others like it—enabled my many years of doing business in China, during which course I witnessed the nation's profound transformation. But, long after committing to advance gender equality there, it seems to me that the Communist Party has underestimated resistance from their nation's culture, a culture that remains rooted in a traditionally Confucian society.

Eden Collinsworth

Only after living in China did I understand how women there struggle to break through the encased male-dominated work environment, not just in circumstantial ways but in the far more complex ways that have to do with self-belief. Very few possess the emotional and financial resources required to brave the tide of political, social, and parental waves pushing them toward marriage.

Hengnu, or "leftover woman," is a term China's Ministry of Education has added to its official lexicon. It describes an urban professional woman over the age of twenty-seven. For those slow in understanding the implications, the prefix sheng is the same as in the word shengcai, or "leftover food."

Setting its own action-oriented time line that delineates exactly when women become stale, the Communist Party provides instruction by age groups. At twenty-five, women must "fight" and "hunt" for a partner. If not married by twenty- eight, women are pressured to "triumph against the odds." Between thirty-one and thirty-four, still-unmarried women are referred to as "advanced leftovers," and by thirty-five, a single woman is the "ultimate" leftover, spiritually flawed in thinking she is higher than the mandate of marriage.

That being the case, Li Ping, a young woman I came to admire in Beijing, was spiritually flawed. Ping was a decent, well-educated, hardworking woman who had made a fortune launching a portfolio of magazines. She had proved herself an astute businesswoman and, by all Western accounts, a great success, but during a revealing conversation in the backseat of her chauffeur-driven car while stalled in Beijing traffic, Ping told me that her younger sister was more successful in the "important way."

"Why would you think that?" I asked.

"It's not what I think, it's what I know. My sister is married, and I am not. I am shaming my parents."

Ping's punishing words spoke of the worst kind of self-judgment, and it was difficult for me to understand the irrational degree to which she was holding her self-esteem in abeyance until she was married. Still, her plight was not without claims on my sympathy. At one time, I, too, would have been an "advanced leftover."

Eventually, I married, having fallen in love with a man in my own country. When I did, I gave myself away to him for free.

"Apocalypse Now" Meets "Lord of the Rings" - An Interview with Fantasy Author Chris Evans

EvansFantasy author Chris Evans new novel Of Bone and Thunder goes on sale today. It's a book that, like many fantasies, revolves around war—but unlike most fantasies it focuses mainly on the grunts doing the fighting as opposed to the politicians moving the chess pieces. As you read the book, you quicky realize that there's a real-life model for his fantasy world (think Vietnam, but with dragons, magicians, and dwarves), and that makes it all-the-more compelling. Kirkus recently called it "memorable and deeply satisfying—a fitting tribute to those who serve." I caught up with Evans to ask him a few questions about his new book:

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Chris Schluep: How do you describe your novel?

Chris Evans: Of Bone And Thunder takes the chaos of "Apocalypse Now" and transports into an epic fantasy world like that of Lord of The Rings.

CS: When did you get the idea for this story?

CE: I've been fascinated by military history since I was a child and developed my love of fantasy around the same time. As I read more of both, the idea of combining the two grew stronger. After using the Napoleonic Wars and British Imperialism in my first fantasy series, I was ready to tackle the Vietnam War. It meant plunging traditional fantasy into a dark and unsettling world, but one that still had hope.

CS: Was it the place or the characters who first came to mind?

CE: The jungle came first, but only because I knew it before I knew the veterans that would ultimately inspire my characters. Still, the jungle is very much a character in its own right.

CS: What kind of research did you do?

CE: My work with veterans as a military history editor provided me with untold sources of inspiration and anecdotes. Coupled with voracious reading and a constant soundtrack of Jimi Hendrix, Jefferson Airplane et. al. in the background, I was transported to a jungle that I hope readers will find every bit as majestic and mysterious as the real thing.

CS: How did you surprise yourself in writing the book?

CE: This novel took me deeper into the creative process than any writing I'd done before. I came to realize that there are no absolute heroes or villains. The same person can be craven and courageous on the same day. War amplifies that and I think I conveyed that in ways I haven't before.

CS: Have you heard from veterans? What response would you hope for?

CE: I have, and it's been incredibly positive. I set out to write a fantasy that captured the essences of the Vietnam War. As such, the characters and their experiences are an amalgamation of the combat tours and of the veterans I know and many more I don't. My hope from the very start was that they would view the book as an homage to what they experienced, and I am gratified that that has been the case.

Who Needs Pictures? B.J. Novak Tells the Story

BkWithNoPicturesFrom his work on The Office we already know B.J. Novak is funny, and we had a great time reading his book, One More Thing earlier this year.  It was when he came to our office for that book that I met Novak and he told me about the children's book he had coming out at the end of September.  A picture book format but with no pictures. Huh. 

When The Book With No Pictures came in I took it home right away, read it to my seven-year-old and we both cracked up.  This is one of those rare children's books that, as a parent, I'm willing to read over-and-ove--and believe me, I've been asked to do exactly that.  Loads of fun for kids and adults, Novak proves that even in children's books, words can do all the heavy lifting.

In his guest essay below, B.J. Novak talks about the origin and creation of The Book with No Pictures (one of our Best Children's Books of October and our top pick for ages 6-8).


When I was a very little kid, I was lucky enough to experience the joy and connection of having my parents read books to me. I found myself drawn above all else to humor, and especially the sense of controlled rebellion that humor always represented in books by my most beloved authors—Dr. Seuss,  Shel Silverstein, and Roald Dahl, to name a few favorites. The world they presented had clear rules and expectations; and when those rules and expectations were bent and broken, the results were exciting, interesting, funny.

Last year, as I waited for my first book, One More Thing, to be published, I would often spend time with my friends and cousins who were starting to have kids. My role in connecting to these kids was always to ask which books he or she would like me to read.

My best friend has a very young and rambunctious son named Bruce. One day when I was visiting, Bruce picked up a book and held it out to me with an insistent expression that I read him whatever was inside, and something occurred to me. This is funny, I thought. Even though I’m the one who can read, and I’m the adult—he’s in control of me, because he’s choosing the book, and the book is in charge. This was basically a little two-year-old producer handing me a script. And it occurred to me that any kid who hands you a book is essentially the producer of that evening’s entertainment, a tiny Harvey Weinstein telling you, “Here’s what you’ll be performing tonight. These are your lines, stick to the script; and I may ask you to do it a second time.” The kid was in charge because the book had the power, and the kid had the book. That was funny to me. And I thought, you know who would really find this funny? The kid.

The idea started as simply as that: If a book is a script that a grownup is being asked to recite, what script would be the funniest one for a kid to hear? As I thought more about this idea, and looked back at my favorite books from childhood from the point of view of someone who had written comedy for adults but not yet for kids, I realized a second necessary function in comedic children’s books that is not present in comedy for adults. Comedy for adults takes the rules of the world for granted - and then twists them. The world has already provided the set-up; all that the humor really needs to provide is a punchline. But comedy for the youngest children needs to accomplish a second purpose, too: It needs to somehow introduce kids to both the setup and the punchline. In an Amelia Bedelia book, a child may need to be introduced to the idea that words can have double meanings; in Dr. Seuss books, there is an established sense of order that it would be particularly funny to disrupt.

This inspired me to play with the ways that a book might introduce the rules of the written word itself, leading to a comic payoff of these rules a few pages later. The fun would come from the child and book “teaming up” to make the adult say words that were purely for the enjoyment of the child. And the lesson would be that written words aren’t simply captions to pictures: They are powerful on their own—and they can always be a child’s ally. To try to make this lesson even more clear, I came up with a title that I knew would inspire a child’s curiosity with its sheer audacity: The Book With No Pictures.

I wrote and printed up a copy and took it around to the houses of other friends with young children and asked if I could watch them read it to their kids—rather than read it myself —because I wanted to be sure I had a book that worked as a reading experience for every type of parent. With each reading I made small changes to phrasings and pacings based on the grownup’s reading and the child’s reactions, until I could tell it inspired the same amount of laughter for everyone, but for different people in different ways. As the book got closer to publication, I focused on the design, keeping an eye out for two purposes: that the page looked beautiful and colorful to a child’s eye; and that the size, spacing, and rhythmic layout of the words were so clear and simple that even the most performance-shy adult could read it easily and intuitively.

That’s the story of The Book With No Pictures. I hope people enjoy it! There’s no sound in the world like a child’s laughter, and while there are so many things I can’t do—for instance, draw—it would be quite an honor to know I’ve contributed a little more of that sound to the world.--B.J. Novak

How I Wrote It: Walter Isaacson, on "The Innovators"

Isaacson"We don’t often focus on how teamwork is key to innovation," says Walter Isaacson, whose new book explores the overlooked collaborations and breakthroughs that would eventually give us the personal computer and the Internet. 

In The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution, one of our Best Books of the Month, Isaacson shows how lone geniuses like Steve Jobs (the subject of his bestselling 2011 biography) didn't single-handedly create the digital age in which we now live.

[*Scroll down to see a video of Isaacson discussing The Innovators.]

Tell me about the the origins of The Innovators

I began working on this book almost fifteen years ago. It grew out of my fascination with the innovations I’d been part of when I ran digital media for Time Inc. and also from my biography of Benjamin Franklin, who was an inventor, publisher, postal service pioneer, and all-around information networker and entrepreneur. Plus I was an electronics geek as a kid (my father and two uncles were electrical engineers), and I loved soldering circuits, sorting transistors, and building ham radios (WA5JTP). I realized, leaving aside Al Gore jokes, that I didn’t even know how the Internet had been invented. My initial plan was to focus on that. But when I interviewed Bill Gates, he convinced me that the simultaneous emergence of the Internet and the personal computer made for a richer tale. I put this book on hold early in 2009, when I began working on a biography of Steve Jobs. But his story reinforced my interest in how the development of the Internet and computers intertwined.

InnovatorsHow is this book different from your previous books?

I wanted to step away from doing biographies, which tend to emphasize the role of singular individuals, and once again do a book like The Wise Men, which I had coauthored with a colleague about the creative teamwork of six friends who shaped America’s cold war policies.

We don’t often focus on how teamwork is key to innovation. There are thousands of books celebrating people we biographers portray, or mythologize, as lone inventors. I’ve produced a few myself. Search the phrase “the man who invented” on Amazon and you get 1,860 book results. But we have far fewer tales of collaborative creativity, which is actually more important in explaining how today’s technology revolution happened. It can also be more interesting.

What’s the first line and what does it say about the book?

"The computer and the Internet are among the most important inventions of our era, but few people know who created them.” It conveys that I don’t want merely to generalize about innovation. We talk so much about innovation these days that it has become a buzzword, drained of clear meaning. Instead, I set out to report on how the most important dozen or so innovations of the digital age actually happened and to tell the tales of the people who created them. What ingredients produced their creative leaps? What skills proved most useful? How did they think and collaborate? Why did some succeed and others fail?

Tools

I’m a gadget freak. I use an iPhone and a Blackberry and sometimes a Samsung smartphone. I have a MacBook Air and a Dell PC and an iPad. I like to be able to write and research on any of them, wherever I am. So one of my most useful tools is Dropbox, which allows me to summon from the vasty cloud any of my documents, interviews, drafts, and outlines on any device, anywhere, anytime.

Soundtrack

New Orleans funk -- Neville Brothers, Dr. John, Wynton Marsalis, Jon Batiste.

How do you relax and recharge?

Long swims to clear my mind.

Research

I love combining archival research with doing my own interviews. There are historians who are better than I am at mining archives and journalists who are better at pursuing reporting leads, but I like to combine both approaches. I’m lucky that I’ve known and been gathering string on most of the players in the digital revolution over the years--ever since my days at Time in the 1980s and 1990s when we put many of them on the cover--and I can get them to sit down with me. I also love to ferret out the academic papers, journals, and oral histories as well as go see the actual artifacts, such as Colossus at Bletchley Park, Charles Babbage’s reconstructed engine at London’s Science Museum, the Mark I at Harvard, and the delightful cornucopia at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View.

What surprised you?

The important role of women in the digital revolution, from Ada Lovelace to Grace Hopper to Jean Jennings. They deserve more recognition.

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> See all of Walter Isaacson's books

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The Best Books of October, Part One: Some Serious Reading

Maybe it's a fall publishing thing, but there is some pretty heady writing in the top 5 of our October Best Books of the Month. We (the Amazon Editors) try to pick our Best of the Month books with all readers in mind—so go here if you're looking for something that might be a little less daunting. But this month it just-so-happens that we have, in order, a National Book Award finalist, a two-time Man-Booker Award-winner, a three-time finalist for the Man-Booker Award, a Rhodes Scholar, and a winner of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize. That probably sounds heavy, like a meal of roast potatoes and super smart pot roast, but let's face it: pot roast is delicious.

Here are the top 5 Best Books of October:

MortalSpotlight: To build on our opening theme of seriousness, let's start with dying. We may as well face that we're all going to do it, so why not do it right? That's the essence of Atul Gawande's Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End. In describing Gawande's book, our Editorial Director, Sara Nelson, puts it this way: doctors have been trained to attack problems—to win—but that victory doesn't look the same to everyone. "Death is the enemy," she quotes from the book. "But the enemy has superior forces." And it can be fruitless to fight a war of annihilation against a superior enemy. "In his compassionate, learned way," Nelson writes, "Gawande shows all of us—doctors included—how mortality must be faced, with both heart and mind.

MantelPick #2: Hilary Mantel is so good she's won the Man-Booker Prize not once but twice. For anyone who's read Wolf Hall or Bring Up the Bodies, you know she's a great writer. But the short stories in The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher show another side of her writing, one that brings vividness to a life more like her own (we assume). In the words of editor Erin Kodicek, "there are only ten stories... a few of them quite spare, but all so chock-full of vivid detail and devilish wit that it leaves the reader wanting more." Kodicek writes, "They don’t hand out Man Bookers like candy, and these stories further explain why Mantel has two on her mantel (so far)."

ToibinPick #3: Sara Nelson describes Colm Toibin's seventh novel as "atmospheric and emotional." It is a story about a forty-year-old widow, set in rural Ireland during the 1960s and 70s, a woman who is "on the verge of slipping back into the isolated life from which her husband had rescued her." Nelson warns that Nora Webster is not entirely likable, accurately pointing out that "a self-centered person mired in depression rarely is." But, she says, Nora slowly wins you over. "Even more important, she eventually finds a way to save herself. This is not a novel that makes a lot of noise—and yet it’s musical. It has a kind of deliberate, note-by-note crescendo—but very few crashing cymbals—as Nora rediscovers her love of singing, learns how art can help her navigate through grief, and how music can help even the most quiet among us to regain our voice."

InnovatorsPick #4: Before Walter Isaacson wrote that fabulous blockbuster about Steve Jobs, he was working on another book. The book is called The Innovators and it is our #4 pick for the Best Books of October. Amazon Senior Editor Jon Foro writes, "Many books have been written about Silicon Valley and the collection of geniuses, eccentrics, and mavericks who launched the 'Digital Revolution'.... but Walter Isaacson goes them one better." He describes The Innovators as "probably the widest-ranging and most comprehensive narrative of them all," building as Isaacson does from the 19th-Century and showing how today's greats, and the greats before them, stood on the shoulders of giants.

JamesPick #5: Marlon James' lyrical and sweeping novel A Brief History of Seven Killings is not an easy book—it is violent, it is big, and it demands that you work sometimes—but it's one that drew me in completely, and I read through the second half of the novel very quickly. The story is written as an oral history, with multiple voices. I was immediately struck by the author's prodigious talent for inhabiting these voices; from men to women, from the patois of a Jamaican rudeboy to the voice of a CIA operative, reading these people is a special experience. The story revolves loosely around the attempt in the 70s to assassinate Bob Marley, but it spans out from there, from Jamaica to Miami and New York in the 90s. In summing up my Best of the Month review of the book, I wrote: "like all great novels, James’ work drew me in, entertained me, and changed me in ways I could not have anticipated."

I'll cover the rest of the top 10 next week. You can find all of our Best of the Month picks here.

 

Rumors of Tears: An Interview with Nicholas Sparks

Ns1If Stephen King is the King of Horror, Nicholas Sparks is, well, the King of Love. There’s no mystery to it, Sparks insists: “I just put people on dates and let them fall in love.”

Across seventeen novels, nine of them adapted for film, that boy-meets-girl formula, which he's explored every angle, has worked amazingly well for Sparks. He’s become one of the world’s best selling and most beloved authors, and he hasn’t slowed down a bit. The film adaptation of his novel The Best of Me opens Friday, and a screen version of The Longest Ride is coming next year.

“What I’m most proud of in my own career is: I never got lazy,” Sparks said during our interview earlier this summer at Amazon’s Seattle campus.

He’s also never tired of writing about love, “the emotion that pretty much drives most of the goodness in the world." Though he tries to walk a line between drama and melodrama--"almost like threading a needle”--he acknowledges some critics think he crosses into mawkish sentimentality. His goal, learned from his hero, King, is to simply tell the best story he can, and let readers decide. And if he makes readers feel something? Then he's done his job.

“I’ve heard rumors that some people have actually shed tears over some of my novels,” he joked.

The interview is a long one--almost 45 minutes--but fans will enjoy hearing Sparks talk about his work habits, and how sales of The Notebook seem to spike whenever Ryan Gosling takes off his shirt.

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>See all of Nicholas Sparks’ books

>See Amazon's exclusive book-and-DVD combo of The Notebook

>Visit our Facebook page for more Nicholas Sparks news and deals this week


 

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