Susan J. Morris
Omnivoracious Editor
A very logical child, Susan grew up reading stories about monsters by night and looking for them on the playground by day--scientifically rigorously--because she couldn't believe the world would be so boring as to be born without monsters. Dark, poetic, gritty sci-fi/fantasy and YA are her favorite inspirations, but she maintains that "It was there" is also a perfectly valid excuse to read a book.

Recent posts by Susan

Writersdontcry

41 Flavors of Body Language for Writers

Body language can transform a fight scene from mere hack-and-slash into a riveting clash of bodies and souls. It can make an otherwise yawn-inducing argument so intense you forget to breathe. And it can take the wooden performance of a...

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Writersdontcry

10 Ways to Get Your Chapter On

First paragraphs should always be gripping. Not just of the first page of the first chapter of the first book in a series—the first paragraph of every chapter. They should tempt you to read on, even though it’s past your...

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Writersdontcry

Playing with Focus: When Description Attacks

As readers, we want our description to be riveting. We want it to be absorptive. We want to feel like we are there—like we can see everything exactly as the author imagines it. But, of course, as writers, we know...

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Writersdontcry

Resolutions for Writers: 10 Ways to Hone Your Craft in 2013

Last year I came up with 52 writing exercises for writers. As I haven’t heard from anyone whose finished them all, I figured this year, instead of coming up with 52 more, I’d do something a bit more practical: a...

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Writersdontcry

Why Side Characters Steal the Spotlight (and How to Steal Some Back)

Main characters, as we all know, are golden gods of absolute awesomeness, with sharp intellects, shiny biceps, and sparkling personalities that make fair folk of all genders faint out of sheer want—both in and outside of the novel. Okay, that’s...

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Writersdontcry

Turning Passive Plots into Active Plots

The sentence, in which the performer of the action is of negligible importance. The character, who waits for things to happen to them. The plot, that is built around reaction rather than action. They all have one very important thing...

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Writersdontcry

Five Dos and Don’ts for Picking an Editor

It used be that editors picked authors. But these days, with self-publishing flourishing, and with an ever-increasing number of authors looking to tweak their manuscripts before sending them off to prospective homes, sometimes it’s the author who is picking the...

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Writersdontcry

Erin M. Evans on Writing Dialogue to Die For

Dialogue is one of the most powerful tools in a writer’s arsenal. It’s totally immersive, it’s evocative of character and place, and it can add layers of tension and nuance like nobody’s business. Not to mention, it’s eminently quotable. All...

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Writersdontcry

Elevator Pitches: How to Talk About Your Book

One of these days, you’re going to have to talk about your book. It’s true! No matter if you’re submitting it to an editor or agent, trapped in an elevator with another writer, or just chatting with someone’s book-junkie grandma...

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Writersdontcry

Writers Don't Cry 2012 Picks: Five Books for Writers

Writers crave a steady diet of fierce, thoughtful, and heartbreakingly well-worded books. These books should have the paragraph structure of the gods, dialogue to die for, and a narrative voice you would follow through gates of hell (though it would...

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